“Baby-O!” Library Concert for Babies & Their Families

“Baby-O!” Library Concert for Babies & Their Families

Saturday, July 25 at 10:30 and 11:00

MaryLee Sunseri presents traditional and original activity songs and fingerplays for parents and caregivers to enjoy with their babies and young children. She is the winner of 4 Parents Choice Awards and 2 American Library Notable Children’s Recordings. Please join us at the library as we sing and move along to these magical, musical songs and chants.

Chinese Paper-Cuts on Exhibit at the Library

June 30, 2015 - July 30, 2015.

June 30, 2015
Media Contact:  Jeanne McCombs

Monterey Public Library, Monterey, California
831.646.3949 / mccombs@monterey.org
www.monterey.org/library
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Chinese paper-cuts by Tianxi Liu, China's leading paper cutting artist, are on exhibit in the Monterey Public Library lobby now through July 30, 2015.  Liu's artworks are widely recognized as the best represented of the inheritance and development of Chinese folk arts.

There are thirty-five pieces in the exhibit, courtesy of Liu's son Zhenshuai Liu, a professor at the Defense Language Institute.  This art dates back to the 6th century and is one of the world's most ancient arat forms.  Paper cuts are popular among Chinese in all walks of life.  They ornament walls, windows and doors during joyful times and celebrations.  Paper cuts are regarded as lucky items.  For more information contact liutianxipapercuts@gmail.com

The Monterey Public Library is located at 625 Pacific Street, Monterey, and is open Monday - Wednesday, 12 noon - 8 p.m., Thursday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., and Sundays, 1 - 5 p.m.

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Chinese Paper-cuts on Exhibit in the Library

June 30, 2015 through July

June 30, 2015
Media Contact:  Jeanne McCombs

Monterey Public Library, Monterey, California
831.646.3949 / mccombs@monterey.org
www.monterey.org/library
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Chinese paper-cuts by Tianxi Liu, China's leading paper cutting artist, are on exhibit in the Monterey Public Library lobby now through July 30, 2015.  Liu's artworks are widely recognized as the best represented of the inheritance and development of Chinese folk arts.

There are thirty-five pieces in the exhibit, courtesy of Liu's son Zhenshuai Liu, a professor at the Defense Language Institute.  This art dates back to the 6th century and is one of the world's most ancient arat forms.  Paper cuts are popular among Chinese in all walks of life.  They ornament walls, windows and doors during joyful times and celebrations.  Paper cuts are regarded as lucky items.  For more information contact liutianxipapercuts@gmail.com

The Monterey Public Library is located at 625 Pacific Street, Monterey, and is open Monday - Wednesday, 12 noon - 8 p.m., Thursday - Friday, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., and Sundays, 1 - 5 p.m.

 # # #

Dead Wake; the Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson

Dead Wake; the Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson

U-boats vs. Lifeboats

A century ago, 1915, Europe was at war.  Britannia still ruled the waves, but German submarine warfare was nibbling away rapidly and heartlessly at England’s maritime supremacy.  At first the German U-boats targeted military and cargo vessels, but passenger ships soon became fair game.  Then ships from neutral countries were fair game.  U-boat captains – most of which were in their twenties or thirties – had total control over their actions while at sea, and elevating their reputations and advancing their careers was measured in terms of the tonnage they managed to sink.   The most successful submarine crews and captain were usually pretty ruthless and often made the least possible effort to minimize human loss. 

Britain, on the other hand, was apparently eager to draw neutral U.S. into their war, and probably didn’t do much to warn ships with U.S. citizens and cargo about impending danger.  Certainly, they didn’t do much to help the Lusitania.

A confluence of circumstances including the ones mentioned above – added to by good luck, bad luck, poorly organized emergency plans, inadequate lifeboats, smugness, and a several of other circumstances led to the sinking of the largest passenger ship in the Cunard line, the (supposedly) unsinkable Lusitania.  Yet, in May 2015, the Lusitania and its somewhere around 2,000 passengers and crew were sunk within about 15 minutes of being hit by a single torpedo.   More than half of them perished.  Among them were many Americans. 

The great thing about this story is the way Larson puts it together.  We all know what’s going to happen to the Lusitania, so this piece of history could be fairly dry despite all of his research on times, dates, maritime factoids, naval strategy, and so forth.  Larson populates this story from the very first with real people – people who made that fateful journey on the Lusitania.  We learn their names, their circumstances, their backgrounds, their personal troubles and joys.  Larson puts a human face on this story which makes it gripping, suspenseful, and harrowing as any tragic adventure story in fiction.   And he adds the political backdrop in which this disaster took place, introducing us to the recently widowed U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, his personal life, his passions, and his challenges as a world leader.

One thing about Larson’s research sides against some of the theorists who over time have insisted that the Lusitania would not have experienced more than one explosion (1 torpedo = 1 explosion) had it not been carrying munitions for Britain in its cargo hold.  (Turns out that wasn’t the cause of the second explosion.)  I always love it when someone debunks a long and widely held theory, and Larson doesn’t disappoint!

Don’t miss this great read! 

 

August Teen Book Club

August Teen Book Club

Thursday, August 27, 2015 at 3:15 pm

The August Teen Book Club books are: Eleanor & Park, Secrets Beyond Scymaria, and The Darkest Part of the Forest. This summer the book club was challenged to read all three of these books and come back for our August meeting ready to discuss.  

 

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

Set over the course of one school year in 1986, this is the story of two star-crossed misfits-smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try. When Eleanor meets Park, you'll remember your own first love-and just how hard it pulled you under.


Secrets Beyond Scymaria by DJ Jameson Smith

Two middle-schoolers cope with troublesome classmates and a sinister professor, kindle an unlikely friendship and discover a curious portal. Unwise choices may put this new friendship in jeopardy and their friend in danger.


The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black

In the woods is a glass coffin. It rests on the ground, and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives....


Hazel and her brother, Ben, live in Fairfold, where humans and the Folk exist side by side. Tourists drive in to see the lush wonders of Faerie and, most wonderful of all, the horned boy. But visitors fail to see the danger.

Since they were children, Hazel and Ben have been telling each other stories about the boy in the glass coffin, that he is a prince and they are valiant knights, pretending their prince would be different from the other faeries, the ones who made cruel bargains, lurked in the shadows of trees, and doomed tourists. But as Hazel grows up, she puts aside those stories. Hazel knows the horned boy will never wake.

Until one day, he does....

As the world turns upside down, Hazel has to become the knight she once pretended to be. But as she's swept up in new love, with shifting loyalties and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?


If you are not a member of Teen Book Club but would like to be, please drop in on our next meeting. You do not have to have read the books to sit in on the conversation.  Join in on the vote for the next book, and get a free copy for yourself. Your only promise is to read the book and come to the next meeting ready to discuss.  


Our next meeting is: August 27, 2015 at 3:15 pm in the Community Room


(High School and Middle School age students welcome.)


For more information contact Eboni at harris@monterey.org

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